Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Canon-mount lens review

Although the letter”L” was originally intended to indicate the word”Luxury,” that the fact of the matter is that Canon L-series lenses are known among professionals and knowledgeable enthusiasts as being among the most picky and best-built lenses on the market today.Along with advanced Ultra Low Dispersion (UD) and Fluorite glass technologies, Aspherical lens surfaces, and Super Spectra Multi Coatings, Canon L-series lenses also feature tough alloy construction and are sealed against moisture and dust.Canon’s L-series lenses, specifically many of the telephoto zooms and prime telephotos, are recognizable by their distinctive white barrels. Even more of a light gray or putty color, this lighter-color enamel is not applied for decorative reasons. Implementing lighter-colored enamel into the outside surfaces of the lens barrel helps decrease heat buildup, reducing the chance of compromising sharpness levels of this lens because of glass expansion.Canon was among the first businesses to apply lighter colors to the barrels of its own lenses. As a result, when seeing the sidelines at sporting occasions, it was difficult to ignore the fact that a majority of the pros photographing these events were shooting with this distinctively colored Canon gear.On many black-barreled telephoto lenses, the focusing action travels beyond the infinity mark. This really is a focusing compensation feature known as”over-focusing,” and can be used to compensate for heat expansion, which shifts the infinity markers when using dark-colored lenses in hotter, sunnier climates.
The G3 X includes superb optics and will capture amazing eclipse images because of its 1.0-inch, 20.2 Megapixel detector. The 25x optical zoom (24-600mm) produces a wonderful size sunlight disk. The front part of the lens has a bayonet mount to accept the FA-DC67B filter connector ring. This ring allows the mounting of a 67mm filter.The zoom range with this camera is exceptional. It has a 16.1 Megapixel, 1/2.3-inch CMOS detector, its lens is equivalent to a 21-1,365millimeter zoom range, which can fill the frame with sunlight in your LCD screen. You won’t want that size picture of the sun because you need to allow enough space around the sun to accommodate the sun’s corona during totality. Details similar to this will be fully explained in forthcoming articles on lenses and exposure.The front of the lens has the same bayonet mount feature of this G3 X to take the FA-DC67B filter adapter ring. This ring allows the mounting of a 67mm filter.The picture quality of this PowerShot will generate a nice documentary picture that will work well for uploading to a treasured social media site.Just such as wildlife, sports and macro pictures, solar and lunar photography will benefit from the smaller APS-C sized sensor because of the 1.6x crop factor. The smaller detector produces a cropped picture when compared with the uncropped full-frame detector. Your sunlight disk will be significantly bigger with the APS-C sensor than with the complete frame sensor.Cameras like the new EOS Rebel T7i, EOS 80D and EOS 7D Mark II have an APS-C sensor and will be great actors for the upcoming total solar eclipse.

Specifications and features

Announced towards the end of 2014, the Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD is a competitively-priced, ultra-wide, full-frame, high-speed zoom targeting the traditional press market as well as landscape and architecture photographers. Like recent models from Tamron, it has several attractive features, including a silent sonic-type motor, optical image stabilization, and anti-ghosting nano-type (eBAND) and hydrophobic fluorine coatings. It also has a circular 9-bladed aperture to help with rendering rounded highlights and smoothing transitions to out-of-focus areas.

The optical formula consists of 16 elements arranged in 13 groups, with a mix of aspherical surfaces and LD glass to reduce various aberrations. With a built-in petal-shaped lens hood and no accessory thread, however, there is no provision for fitting filters — a potential downside for landscape photographers. The lens focuses to 11” (28cm), measures 3.87 x 5.63” (98.4 x 145mm), and weighs a not-insignificant 2.42 lb (1.1kg). It is available for around $1,199 (USD).

 

Specifications

  • 18 elements arranged in 13 groups
  • F2.8 constant aperture
  • Sonic-type motor
  • Aspheric surfaces
  • LD glass
  • 9x circular aperture blades
  • 11” (28cm) minimum focus

 

Measurements: Good sharpness levels

Measurements: Good sharpness levels

With an overall score of 32 points on the demanding 50-Mpix sensor of the Canon EOS 5DS R and a sharpness score equivalent of 23 Mpix, the Tamron is an excellent performer optically for a lens like this. It has good sharpness levels generally, albeit with some astigmatism, notably at 15mm wide-open, but also at other focal lengths as well. There’s also some field curvature mid-zoom, but it’s not unexpected in an ultra-wide zoom like this. Control of chromatic aberration is excellent at 30mm and still good at 15mm; however ,it may be noticeable at times in the outer two-thirds of the image field.

Barrel distortion is inevitable, and while relatively high at 15mm, it avoids the difficult-to-correct complex (mustache) type. Typically, there’s a little pincushion from 24mm onwards, though distortion is negligible at 20mm. The relatively low vignetting and transmission ranging from T3.1-3.2 is also good.

Measurements: Good sharpness levels

 

Although the letter”L” was initially intended to suggest the term”Luxury,” that the truth of the matter is that Canon L-series lenses have been recognized among professionals and knowledgeable enthusiasts as being among the most picky and best-built lenses on the market today.Along with advanced Ultra Low Dispersion (UD) and Fluorite glass technologies, Aspherical lens surfaces, and Super Spectra Multi Coatings, Canon L-series lenses also contain tough alloy structure and are sealed against moisture and dust.Canon’s L-series lenses, specifically many of those telephoto zooms and prime telephotos, are recognizable by their distinctive white barrels. Even more of a light grey or putty colour, this lighter-color tooth isn’t employed for cosmetic reasons. Implementing lighter-colored enamel into the external surfaces of the lens helps minimize heat buildup, reducing the possibility of compromising sharpness levels of this lens because of glass expansion.Canon was one of the first companies to apply lighter colors into the barrels of its lenses. As a result, when seeing the sidelines at sporting occasions, it was difficult to ignore how a vast majority of the pros photographing these occasions were shooting with this distinctively colored Canon gear.On many black-barreled telephoto lenses, the focusing activity travels beyond the infinity mark. This really is a focusing settlement feature known as”over-focusing,” and is used to compensate for heat expansion, which shifts the infinity mark when utilizing dark-colored lenses in hotter, sunnier climates.

To get an notion of which camera is perfect for you it can help to know which features are available on different levels of cameras. An entry DSLR can take good pictures and might be perfect for people that are just getting into photography, but it may lack some features that professionals desire. And while a professional-level DSLR excels at image quality and low-light functionality, it may not have some of those automated settings that assist individuals that are only getting started. With that in mind, let’s take a peek at a few of the features in different levels of Canon DSLRs.Professional photographers for whom resolution is king ought to look no farther than the 5Ds. This camera’s 50.6 MP full frame sensor has almost two times as many megapixels as its closest competition, the 5D Mark III, which makes it the best Canon DSLR for photography (though today that the 5D Mark IV is out, it has changed somewhat ). If the main issue to you in a camera is the ability to shoot ultra high resolution images which can be printed crystal clear and extremely big, the 5Ds is your very best bet.Just since the 5Ds makes the top of our list as a result of its powerful sensor does not mean that it is exceptional whatsoever. This camera is similar to the 5D Mark III (including video capacities and autofocus system) but it doesn’t stand up quite as well when it comes to things like max burst rate and low light performance.

Tamron SP 15-30mm f2.8 Di VC USD (A012) vs. Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PR FX

Tamron SP 15-30mm f2.8 Di VC USD (A012) vs. Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PR FX

An ultra-wide high-speed zoom from Sigma is conspicuous by its absence, but rival maker Tokina offers a model with a similar range and maximum aperture. At around $849, it’s attractively priced, and on the Canon EOS 5DS R it performs quite well against the newer Tamron, particularly in terms of peak sharpness when stopped down. Unfortunately, it has significantly lower sharpness at F2.8-4 throughout the zoom range, which is unusually more noticeable at the shorter focal lengths.

The Tokina’s sharpness across the frame isn’t a match for the Tamron until f/5.6. Vignetting is low for a lens like this, but even then, it’s still not as low as the Tamron’s until it’s stopped down significantly.

In other regards, however, the Tokina performs well. Transmission is similar, ranging from T3.1-3.4, and the older rival even surpasses the new model in terms of much better control of distortion and chromatic aberration at the wider end.

Photographers that are primarily concerned with shooting really high-resolution photos will love the 5Ds since it provides the highest resolution photos in the Canon lineup. Photographers who want high-resolution images in a smaller, lighter package should also consider the Sony alpha a7RII complete frame mirrorless camera, which shoots 42.4 MP photos. People who care about resolution and want quicker burst speeds and greater ISOs may want to take a closer look in the EOS 1D X.The 5D Mark III is one of Canon’s powerful cameras for still photography and Canon’s finest DSLR for video. Though the 5D Mark III’s 22.3 MP sensor can’t hold a candle to that of the 5Ds, it’s still powerful enough to be the choice of many professional photographers. Unless you are thinking about blowing up your photos to billboard size, those 22.3 MP are plenty! The 5D Mark III has a leg up on the 5Ds in certain ways for example its faster burst speed (6 FPS vs. 5 FPS from the 5Ds) and maximum ISO capacities (25,600 vs. 12,800 in the 5Ds). The 5D Mark III’s video capabilities make it a favorite option with serious videographers. With the ability to shoot 1080p video at 30 FPS and amazing low light performance, the Canon 5D Mark III excels in regards to creating movies.This camera might be a bit behind the movie capabilities of cameras such as Sony’s Alpha a7SII but it makes up for its lower video resolution and absence of a reverse screen with things like fast autofocus, super crisp pictures, and the ability to take phenomenal stills photos.

Tamron SP 15-30mm f2.8 Di VC USD (A012) vs. Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PR FX

Tamron SP 15-30mm f2.8 Di VC USD (A012) vs. Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PR FX

Tamron SP 15-30mm f2.8 Di VC USD (A012) vs. Tokina AT-X 16-28 F2.8 PR FX

 

In a perfect world, all camera lenses create images which are sharp (even at the edges), without any distortion, display zero optical aberrations, and replicate color in true fidelity. The problem is that we don’t reside in an ideal world, which means if we need”perfect” lenses at a broad range of focal lengths and maximum apertures, we have to go past the basics.In the case of faster, wider-aperture, and wider-angle lenses, optical aberrations and edge sharpness can be challenging, even among lenses made of the finest optical glass. To remedy the issue, Canon’s optical engineers–with the assistance of innovative CAD computer applications–started adding free-curved or aspheric surfaces to their lens designs.Unlike conventional convex and concave lens surfaces, aspheric surfaces feature additional dips and climbs along the surfaces of the lens element that enhance edge-to-edge image sharpness with a noticeable reduction of curved aberrations.Just as the tiny winglets in the tips of many business aircraft wings enhance fuel economy by reducing drag as the wings slice through the atmosphere, aspheric lens surfaces enhance overall image quality by maintaining high levels of controlling power evenly and equally across the whole image field.Though more complex and costly to design and manufacture, just one aspheric component can often replace a couple of curved elements, which in turn makes it possible to style lenses that not only perform better, but are somewhat smaller, lighter, lighter, and therefore are often less expensive to produce than conventional lens designs.

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) Canon vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) Canon vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

Now that Canon has updated its EF16-35mm F2.8L with a third-generation model, we can see just how good a performer the Tamron is. It even outperforms the highly-regarded EF 16-35mm F4 IS USM, though in truth, the overall score of 32 against 27 for the F4 is closer than the numbers suggest.

Along with Super Spectra and SWC lens coatings, smudge- and fingerprint-resistant Fluorine coatings are used on the surfaces of lens components on select Canon EF-series lenses.There are 3 distinct families of Canon lenses. They comprise the EF mount, for use with Canon’s full-frame (24 x 36mm) and APS-C (22.3 x 14.9mm) format DSLRs, the EF-S mount for use exclusively with Canon’s APS-C format DSLRs, and the EF-M mount, designed for use only with Canon EOS M mirrorless cameras.What these lens mounts come in common are solid-state electronics that enable near-instant communicating between the camera and the lens. By replacing mechanical parts with electronic data-transfer controller, Canon lenses are capable of achieving higher-speed autofocus and precision ion control, which guarantees sharper, consistently accurate exposures under the most demanding shooting conditions.Because the image circles around Canon EF lenses are made to cover full-frame sensors, they can also be used on APS-C DSLRs, which have smaller (1.6x crop variable ) surface areas. The opposite–mounting EF-S lenses on full-frame EF mounts–is not possible since the image proportions of EF-S lenses are smaller than the ring size required to pay a full-frame sensor. EF-S lenses are strictly for use on the EF-S lens mounts located on Canon APS-C format DSLRs.
In an ideal world, all camera lenses create images which are sharp (even at the edges), free of distortion, display zero optical aberrations, and replicate color in true fidelity. The dilemma is that we do not live in a perfect world, so if we need”perfect” lenses in a wide array of focal lengths and maximum apertures, we must go past the basics.In the case of quicker, wider-aperture, and wider-angle lenses, optical aberrations and edge sharpness could be hard, even one of lenses made of the best optical glass. To remedy the issue, Canon’s optical engineers–with the assistance of advanced CAD computer software –started adding free-curved or aspheric surfaces to their own lens designs.Unlike traditional convex and concave lens surfaces, aspheric surfaces comprise additional dips and rises along the surfaces of the lens component that enhance edge-to-edge image sharpness with a noticeable reduction of curved aberrations.Just as the small winglets at the tips of several business aircraft wings enhance fuel economy by reducing drag as the wings slice through the atmosphere, aspheric lens surfaces enhance overall picture quality by preserving high levels of resolving power evenly and equally across the whole picture field.Though more complicated and expensive to design and manufacture, a single aspheric element can frequently replace two or more spherical elements, which consequently makes it feasible to style lenses that not only work better, but are somewhat smaller, lighter, and therefore are often less expensive to produce than conventional lens designs.

The Canon models excel in their performance at and close to the maximum aperture, where sharpness across the frame is excellent, except for the new EF16-35mm F2.8L III USM at 28mm where, somewhat surprisingly, its center sharpness dips beneath the other two.

Another surprise, given the $1,000 price tag, is its much higher vignetting and higher levels of chromatic aberration over the Tamron. Still, Canon continues to demonstrate its know-how in these two models, with lower distortion and very good transmission, regardless of the Tamron’s similar scores.

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) Canon vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) Canon vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) Canon vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM vs. Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM

 

Conclusion

Now that we’ve tested the Tamron against two strong performers from Canon on the same body, we can see just how good the 15-30mm F2.8 is optically. Given the price, it has a good balance of sharpness even wide-open, along with good control of chromatic aberration.

On the flip side, it has some slight field curvature and astigmatism along with slightly higher levels of distortion. However, the Tamron avoids complex distortion, and thanks in part to its large convex front element, it has good control of vignetting. Although image stabilization adds to the size, weight, and complexity of the lens, given the overall performance and competitive pricing, it remains a tempting alternative to the own-brand models.

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